We received a question from one of our members, and she wants to know about Fathom Cruises’ ship, the Adonia.

The intimate Adonia.

The intimate Adonia.

The Fathom is currently the smallest of P&O Cruises seven ships, and she is designed to offer a more intimate cruising experience. Adonia accommodates 710 passengers and, because of her smaller size, explores ports the larger ships of today are unable to visit. From P&O’s website:

With wood-style paneling, a grand staircase and traditional artworks, her ambience and décor are in keeping with the traditions of cruising. Yet being a 21st century ship, (she was built in 2001) there is modernity to her detailing, all of which is beautifully crafted.

There is dining overlooking the wake and evenings with after dinner speakers. There is a card room with panoramic ocean views, ample sunbathing space and restaurants which include Sorrento, the Ocean Grill and the elegant Pacific Restaurant. And of course being smaller, everything on our Adonia cruise ship is just a short walk away.

Adonia’s Crow’s Nest offers far reaching views by day and live music by night and Anderson’s bar feels reassuringly British. In her grand lounge, the dance floor plays host to an elegant waltz or cha-cha-cha and its stage presents a wide range of evening entertainment, from shows to classical recitals.

Adonia will be reassigned to Fathom in April 2016, which focuses on Impact travel, and provides the opportunity to build community with like-minded travelers, become immersed in another culture, and work alongside its people to create enduring social impact. Carnival, its parent company, was granted permission by the U.S. to include Cuba as part of its offerings. Adonia will also visit the Dominican Republic.

Fathom and Cuba

Fathom and Carnival announced three ports of call for the voyages, which begin May 2016: Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba. The trip will focus on supporting cultural exchange and economic development for the Cuban people, and include a variety of artistic, educational and humanitarian activities,” the company said. Most of the trip will be spent in Havana, and for the first two days cruisers can partake of a walking tour of the city, meetings with Cuban artists and local entrepreneurs, and Q&A sessions with authors from the island.